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CALENDULA FACT SHEETS

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Fiesta Gitana

 A compact dwarf variety that grows around 8 to 12 inches tall. This plant is often called “English Marigold or Pot Marigold”, although they are not in the same plant family. They are drought resistant and easy to grow. Flowers are doubled and come in shades of orange, yellow, and gold. Flower petals are edible and colorful additions to a salad. Deadheading improves the look of the plant and lengthens flowering period. Attracts pollinators to the garden.

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Radio Calendula

Self-seeding, hardy annual, 18-24" tall, Radio was introduced to gardeners in the 1930s and is now quite hard to find. Beautiful orange flowers have quill-like edible petals. Well suited for pots. 

 

Edible petals of the flowers can be used fresh or dried ("flower confetti") in soups, soufflés, rice dishes, baked goods, and to garnish desserts. Calendula is a popular choice for brightening up salad mix. Tangy slightly sweet flavor. 

Note: Remove the petals from the flower base before consuming as the base can be quite bitter. Do not eat the calyx or flower centers.
Try making calendula oil or tea by picking the flowers at full bloom and letting the petals dry.


Calendula has been used medicinally for centuries. Ancient Romans grew them to treat scorpion stings! In the Middle Ages calendula was a common remedy for everything from smallpox to indigestion. Today’s herbalists use it to make a healing salve for sunburn, chapped lips, minor burns, cuts, and scrapes.

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Balls Orange

An old-fashioned variety that grows around 12 to 24 inches tall. This plant is often called “English Marigold or Pot Marigold”, although they are not in the same plant family. The plant is drought resistant and easy to grow. The large orange flowers (up to 3”) are fully doubled. Flower petals are edible and perfect to add color to a salad. When dried it can be used as a saffron substitute.  The colorful flowers attract bees and butterflies to the garden to aid in pollination. They are wonderful long-lasting cut flowers.

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 Erfurter Calendula

Fully double, bright orange flowers on 18-24” plants. Erfurter is a preferred variety for commercial production in the US, with larger flowers and a somewhat higher resin content than Resina. Also blooms profusely, but not as prolifically as Resina. Petals can be used to make a natural dye, or even fed to chickens to keep egg yolks extra vibrant. (No joke! There is calendula produced In Italy for this specific purpose!) For easy harvest, we prefer to pick the petals off flowering heads when they just start to dry and turn inward. Variety originates in Germany, where its full name is Erfurter Orangefarbigen. Aka, Orange Zinger.

 

Edible petals of the flowers can be used fresh or dried ("flower confetti") in soups, soufflés, rice dishes, baked goods, and to garnish desserts. Calendula is a popular choice for brightening up salad mix. Tangy slightly sweet flavor. 

Note: Remove the petals from the flower base before consuming as the base can be quite bitter. Do not eat the calyx or flower centers.
Try making calendula oil or tea by picking the flowers at full bloom and letting the petals dry.


Calendula has been used medicinally for centuries. Ancient Romans grew them to treat scorpion stings! In the Middle Ages calendula was a common remedy for everything from smallpox to indigestion. Today’s herbalists use it to make a healing salve for sunburn, chapped lips, minor burns, cuts, and scrapes.

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Touch of Red Bluff

Coffee-cream petal fronts and a crimson reverse. Its two distinct tones allow it to mix with almost any color in a border or vase. Matures quickly and reaches 24" in height.  Great for container growing.

 

Edible petals of the flowers can be used fresh or dried ("flower confetti") in soups, soufflés, rice dishes, baked goods, and to garnish desserts. Calendula is a popular choice for brightening up salad mix. Tangy slightly sweet flavor. 

Note: Remove the petals from the flower base before consuming as the base can be quite bitter. Do not eat the calyx or flower centers.
Try making calendula oil or tea by picking the flowers at full bloom and letting the petals dry.


Calendula has been used medicinally for centuries. Ancient Romans grew them to treat scorpion stings! In the Middle Ages calendula was a common remedy for everything from smallpox to indigestion. Today’s herbalists use it to make a healing salve for sunburn, chapped lips, minor burns, cuts, and scrapes.

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